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Additional resources for Determination of the Size and Shape of Protein Molecules. A Laboratory Manual of Analytical Methods of Protein Chemistry (Including Polypeptides): Volume 3

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After reclosing K, a second reading can be made after equilibrium is again attained. If the capillary be of 0-5 m m bore, very little transport of solvent across the membrane will be caused by this opening of K. 5. If the membrane containing dialysed protein solution be connected to G at room temperature, and the clamps A, C, and Κ be open when the osmometer is transferred to 1°, there is no danger of excessive movement of toluene in the graduated capillary. G o o d rubber connections, provided where necessary with screw-clamps, have proved to be more satisfactory than glass joints and taps and the exclusion of such is deliberate.

33 . . 38 . . . . . . 40 43 46 49 51 52 . 55 . . . . . . . . 2 OSMOTIC PRESSURE By G. S. ADAIR from The Physiological Laboratory, Cambridge THE first determinations of osmotic pressures of proteins were made by Starling (1899). He filtered blood serum through a gelatin membrane and obtained a solution which contained the crystalloid constituents of serum but from which the proteins had been withheld. Measurements of the osmotic pressures of the unfiltered serum and of the protein-free filtrate showed that the serum proteins gave osmotic pressures of 30-40 m m Hg.

The tubes were then suspended in air for 16 hr. R o o m temperature was 18°-20°C and humidity 7 0 - 7 5 % . Under these conditions collodion solutions which contain glycerine give more permeable membranes than those which contain glycol. The mixtures referred to in Table I contain from 0-244 to 1-44 ml glycerine per g pyroxylin. Increase in glycerine content increases the thickness of the membrane and its water content, expressed in grammes water per gramme pyroxylin. The column in Table I headed q" gives the volume of distilled water filtered 2 at 19°, calculated for a membrane of surface area 28-4 c m and a pressure 9 of 600 cm water.

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