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By Patricia L. Conway, Rosie Stern, Lai Tran

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In anticipation of this growth, a major supplier of prebiotics invested €165 million in 2004 in a second plant for production of prebiotics (O’Rafti, 2004). Currently, honey competes with sugar (largely sucrose) for use as a sweetener in the food industry. It is known that simple sugars (such as sucrose) are rapidly absorbed in the human small intestine, and are therefore not available to the microbes in the lower intestine. In contrast, honey contains both simple and complex sugars, the latter of which are not degraded by host enzymes or absorbed in the small intestine, and which are thus available to microbial populations in the large intestine.

2 0 No sugar Sucrose Inulin Honey 2 Honey 5 Honey 7 Honey 9 Honey 14 Growth is expressed as optical density (OD) at 610 nm. 1. 3 Effect of honey on growth of pathogenic bacteria Cultures of four species of pathogenic bacteria were grown in media containing honey or glucose for 24 hours at 37°C in an anaerobic chamber. Growth was determined by optical densitometry at a wavelength of 610 nm. 3). In contrast, most of the honeys seemed to stimulate the growth of E. 6-fold for E. 3) when in pure culture.

2 0 No sugar Sucrose Inulin Honey 2 Honey 5 Honey 7 Honey 9 Honey 14 Growth is expressed as optical density (OD) at 610 nm. 1. 3 Effect of honey on growth of pathogenic bacteria Cultures of four species of pathogenic bacteria were grown in media containing honey or glucose for 24 hours at 37°C in an anaerobic chamber. Growth was determined by optical densitometry at a wavelength of 610 nm. 3). In contrast, most of the honeys seemed to stimulate the growth of E. 6-fold for E. 3) when in pure culture.

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