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By Sarah B.K. von Billerbeck

This paintings examines neighborhood possession in UN peacekeeping and the way nationwide and overseas actors engage and proportion accountability in fragile post-conflict contexts

summary: This paintings examines neighborhood possession in UN peacekeeping and the way nationwide and overseas actors have interaction and proportion accountability in fragile post-conflict contexts

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Whose peace? : local ownership and United Nations peacekeeping

This paintings examines neighborhood possession in UN peacekeeping and the way nationwide and overseas actors have interaction and proportion accountability in fragile post-conflict contexts summary: This paintings examines neighborhood possession in UN peacekeeping and the way nationwide and foreign actors have interaction and proportion accountability in fragile post-conflict contexts

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This stands in contrast to much of the literature on international organizations including the UN, which, as mentioned, portrays the latter as eschewing operational success in favor of adherence to norms. Conclusion This chapter has provided a conceptual framework for understanding the concept of local ownership in peacekeeping. It has shown how peacekeeping entails contradictions that compel the UN to alternately violate its normative or operational obligations. While the UN displays a normative discomfort with violations of the principle of self-determination, it also acknowledges that international intrusion into post-conflict states may be a necessity for successful peacekeeping; however, intrusion into post-conflict states necessarily entails a curtailment of the latters’ ability to determine their own political future.

11 Doehring, “Self-Determination,” 64; Robert Jackson, Quasi-States: Sovereignty, International Relations and the Third World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 1990), 152; and Matthew Saul, “Local Ownership of Post-Conflict Reconstruction in International Law: The Initiation of International Involvement,” Journal of Conflict and Security Law 16, no. 1 (2011): 166. 12 Ralph Wilde, “Competing Normative Visions of Exit,” in Exit Strategies and State Building, ed. Richard Caplan (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012); and Saul, “Local Ownership,” 179–80.

It examines the definitional ambiguity surrounding the term and the lack of clarity about who local owners are on the part of scholars and international practitioners. It shows two notable tendencies in usages of the term: first, that international actors strongly associate local ownership with enhanced legitimacy and sustainability in peacekeeping because of its perceived ability to mitigate violations of self-determination and minimize external intrusion; and second, that they usually view local ownership in technocratic terms—that is, local ownership is perceived as a technical solution to problems encountered in the conduct of peace operations, and it can be created and sustained through technical means like capacity building and training.

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